Viktigheten av riktig behandling og konsekvensene utilstrekkelig behandling kan ha for stoffskiftepasienter

 

Breast Cancer Res. 2003

Breast cancer in association with thyroid disorders.

Turken O1, NarIn Y, DemIrbas S, Onde ME, Sayan O, KandemIr EG, YaylacI M, Ozturk A.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The relationship between breast cancer and thyroid diseases is controversial. Discrepant results have been reported in the literature. The incidences of autoimmune and nonautoimmune thyroid diseases were investigated in patients with breast cancer and age-matched control individuals without breast or thyroid disease.

CONCLUSION:

Our results indicate an increased prevalence of autoimmune and nonautoimmune thyroid diseases in breast cancer patients.

 

Michalaki V1, Kondi-Pafiti A, Gennatas S, Antoniou A, Primetis H, Gennatas C. 2009 Breast cancer in association with thyroid disorders.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The relationship between breast cancer and thyroid diseases is controversial. Conflicting results have been reported in the literature. The incidence of autoimmune and non-autoimmune thyroid diseases were investigated in patients with breast cancer who had received prior therapy as compared with age-matched control individuals without breast or thyroid disease.

CONCLUSION:

This study demonstrated a similar incidence of thyroid enlargement and the same frequency of thyroid disturbances in patients with breast cancer and controls. No relationship was found among ER and PR status, and the presence of serum thyroid autoantibodies. Although we have been unable to demonstrate any impact of breast cancer therapy on thyroid function tests, more prolonged studies with larger number of patients may be required to demonstrate significant trends.

 

C Giani, P Fierabracci, R Bonacci, A Gigliotti, D Campani, F De Negri, D Cecchetti, E Martino, and A Pinchera Relationship between breast cancer and thyroid disease: relevance of autoimmune thyroid disorders in breast malignancy.

The Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism 2003

In conclusion, 1) the present study provides evidence that the overall prevalence of thyroid disorders is increased in patients with breast cancer, and 2) thyroid autoimmune disorders, especially Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, account to a large extent for the increased prevalence of thyroid disease in patients with breast cancer. This feature is independent from the ER and PR status of the primary tumor. The present findings call attention to the usefulness of screening for thyroid disease in any patient with breast cancer.

 

Shakila Thangaratinam, Alex Tan, Ellen Knox,  Mark D Kilby et al, BMJ 2011 Association between thyroid autoantibodies and miscarriage and preterm birth: meta-analysis of evidence

Abstract

Objectives To evaluate the association between thyroid autoantibodies and miscarriage and preterm birth in women with normal thyroid function. To assess the effect of treatment with levothyroxine on pregnancy outcomes in this group of women.

Conclusion The presence of maternal thyroid autoantibodies is strongly associated with miscarriage and preterm delivery. There is evidence that treatment with levothyroxine can attenuate the risks.

 

Roberto Negro, Gianni Formoso, Tiziana Mangieri, Antonio Pezzarossa, Davide Dazzi, and Haslinda Hassan, 2006 Levothyroxine Treatment in Euthyroid Pregnant Women with Autoimmune Thyroid Disease: Effects on Obstetrical Complications

Abstract

Context: Euthyroid women with autoimmune thyroid disease show impairment of thyroid function during gestation and seem to suffer from a higher rate of obstetrical complications.

Objective: We sought to determine whether these women suffer from a higher rate of obstetrical complications and whether levothyroxine (LT4) treatment exerts beneficial effects.

Conclusions: Euthyroid pregnant women who are positive for TPOAb develop impaired thyroid function, which is associated with an increased risk of miscarriage and premature deliveries. Substitutive treatment with LT4 is able to lower the chance of miscarriage and premature delivery.

 

Roberto Negro, Alan Schwartz, Riccardo Gismondi, Andrea Tinelli, Tiziana Mangieri, and Alex Stagnaro-Green 2010 Increased Pregnancy Loss Rate in Thyroid Antibody Negative Women with TSH Levels between 2.5 and 5.0 in the First Trimester of Pregnancy

Abstract

Context: The definition of what constitutes a normal TSH during pregnancy is in flux. Recent studies suggested that the first trimester upper limit of normal for TSH should be 2.5 mIU/liter

Conclusions: The increased incidence of pregnancy loss in pregnant women with TSH levels between 2.5 and 5.0 mIU/liter provides strong physiological evidence to support redefining the TSH upper limit of normal in the first trimester to 2.5 mIU/liter.

Pregnant women with high-normal TSH values are at increased risk for pregnancy loss.